Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University

About

Dept. Advanced Brain Science

Director, Professor Ryuta KAWASHIMA
Assistant Professor (Additional) Takayuki NOZAWA
Assistant Professor (Additional) Rui NOUCHI
Assistant Professor Rie RYOKE
Guest Instructor Shinichiro KANOH
Guest Instructor Yoshiyuki TACHIBANA
Guest Instructor Naoki MIURA
Guest Instructor Keisuke WAKUSAWA
Guest Instructor Satoru YOKOYAMA
Homepage of This Laboratory

For daily functional brain measurement,
please also see Dept. Ubiquitous Sensing

This department has been designed to develop an approach for maintaining and improving the brain and mental health in a diverse and complex society from the standpoint of brain science, aiming to maintain and improve brain functions; cognitive neuroscience and sychology, aiming to maintain a healthy and tranquil state of mind at each aging stage.

Research for healthy children: Based on a partnership with the Sendai education board, we are engaged in an interdisciplinary research project, which aims to identify the factors affecting motivation for learning in children and adolescents. The goal of this project is to develop an intervention program or a scientifically evidence-based policy for enhancing child development.

Intervention researches: Combined with recent neuroimaging techniques, cognitive neuroscience, psychology, and epidemiology, we will investigate how to develop the executive functions of healthy children, how to retain these functions in healthy adults, and how to improve them in community-dwelling seniors. We have conducted intervention studies using exercise and cognitive training for seniors. To develop techniques for maintaining and improving the brain and mental health in a diverse and complicated society from the standpoint of cognitive neuroscience, we are focusing on the functions of the prefrontal cortex (PFC) in humans. The human PFC plays a major role in the higher cognitive functions necessary for maintaining a healthy social life. One particularly important function of the PFC is the executive function which involves planning, selection, and ongoing
regulation of behavior.

Fig.2
Fig.2 Four weeks of a combination exercise training improved cognitive functions
(executive functions, episodic memory, and processing speed) in the healthy
elderly (Nouchi et al., 2014).
Fig.2
Fig.3 Framework of the “Motivation for Learning” project: Based on a partnership
with the Sendai education board, we are engaged in an interdisciplinary
research project which aims to identify the factors effectingon motivation
for learning in children and adolescence.

Publication

  1. Nozawa T, Taki Y, Kanno A, Akimoto Y, Ihara M, Yokoyama R, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi R, Sekiguchi A, Takeuchi H, Miyauchi CM, Ogawa T, Goto T, Sunda T, Shimizu T, Tozuka E, Hirose S, Nanbu T, Kawashima R. Effects of different types of cognitive training on cognitive function, brain structure, and driving safety in senior daily drivers: A pilot study. Behavioural Neurology, in press.
  2. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Hashizume H, Sekiguchi A, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Sassa Y, Kawashima R. Working memory training impacts the mean diffusivity in the dopaminergic system. Brain Structure and Function, in press
  3. Nouchi R, Kawashima R. Beneficial effects of exercise and cognitive training on cognitive functions in older adults: Introduction of Smart Aging studies. Diet and Exercise in Cognitive Function and Neurological Diseases, Wiley-Blackwell, 205-212, 2015.
  4. Kawashima R, Hiller DL, Sereda SL, Antonczak M, Serger K, Gannon D, Ito S, Otake H, Yunomae D, Kobayashi A, Muller C, Murata H, FallCreek S. SAIDO Learning as a cognitive intervention for dementia care: A preliminary study. Journal of the American Medical Directors Association, 16: 56-62, 2015.
  5. Kawashima R, Nouchi R, Matsumoto T, Tanimoto Y. Riding a motorcycle affects cognitive functions of healthy adults. International Journal of Automotive Engineering, 5: 73-76, 2014.
  6. Nouchi R, Kawashima R. Improving cognitive function from children to old age: A systematic review of recent Smart Ageing intervention studies. Advances in Neuroscience, 2014:235479, 2014.
  7. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Hashizume H, Sekiguchi A, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Sassa Y, Kawashima R. Effects of Multitasking-Training on Gray Matter Structure and Resting State Neural Mechanisms. Human Brain Mapping, 35:3646-3660, 2014.
  8. Nouchi R, Taki Y, Takeuchi H, Sekiguchi A, Hashizume H, Nozawa T, Nouchi H, Kawashima R. Four weeks combination exercise training improved executive functions, episodic memory and processing speed in healthy elderly people: Evidence from a randomized controlled trial. AGE, 36(2): 787-799, 2014.
  9. Nouchi R, Taki Y, Takeuchi H, Hashizume H, Nozawa T, Kambara T, Sekiguchi A, Miyauchi CM, Kotozaki Y, Nouchi H, Kawashima R. Brain training game boosts executive functions, working memory and processing speed in the young adults: A randomized controlled trial. PLoS ONE, 8(2): e55518, 2013.
  10. Takeuchi H, Taki Y, Nouchi R, Hashizume H, Sekiguchi A, Kotozaki Y, Nakagawa S, Miyauchi CM, Sassa Y, Kawashima R. Effects of working memory-training on functional connectivity and cerebral blood flow during rest. Cortex, 49(8), 2106-2125, 2013.

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